Gambling Questions Answered by an Expert

Playing in the best casino in Malaysia always raises a question, especially when safety and you money is at stake. Here are the questions that tackles winning in casinos brought by numerous gamblers:

Q. I’m interested in winning goals and losing limitations when determining when to leave a game. You set a goal of winning, and you leave if you hit it. You also set a failure limit, and if you lose so much, you’re going away.

How do you manage your money? Does it change if you’ve got a bottom, like a card counter in blackjack?

A. In games where the casino has an edge — almost all of them, against the vast majority of players, I proposed an updated winning goals and losing limits floating scheme.

I don’t think it’s realistic to have a rough victory. If you go into a $100 casino and set a $20 winning goal, you can achieve it by winning your first $5 hands in blackjack. Would you at that stage walk out? If you could honestly answer “yes,” you would be in a very small minority. Alternatively, I recommend that players let goals and limits float. When you have a $50 risk limit, leave it as a hard floor, by all means. But if your target of winning is $20 and you hit it, then increase your goal of winning to $40 and lift the floor to $30. Now, you can keep playing with the early win and still guarantee that you’re not going to lose as much as your original limit.

For advantage teams, the situation is very different. If you have a lead on the table, it doesn’t make sense to limit wins. Advantage players leave because boredom is creeping in, or because they have other things to do to keep sessions short and avoid detection. Blackjack players can switch as the count is at a disadvantage at a stage. If you don’t have an edge, you want to let it continue to work for you.

Whether you have the edge or the home. No winning goals, loss limits or any other money management scheme affects a bit of that edge.

Q. The other day, my wife and I talked about this because she prefers the video slots and the three-reels I use. She has a limit of $3 if she plays a penny game, 30 paylines, 10 points per line total bet. If I play a game of the dollar, one payline, taking up to three coins, it is also a maximum of $3.

If we make 1,000 bets each, then $3,000 per piece, which one of us will end up with more money?

A. The amounts vary from state to state and from casino to casino, but it is common practice to have higher payback rates for games of higher base denominations.

To clarify, let’s look at figures from April’s monthly report on the Illinois Gaming Board. We could use other states and get a similar story, but Illinois estimates percentages in his paper, so I can be a bit lazy and not take the time to do the raw numbers arithmetic.

Penny slots paid 88.16 percent in March at Illinois casinos, while dollar slots paid 92.29 percent.

Average losses for a penny player would have been about $355 per $3,000 in wagers, while average losses would have been about $219 for the dollar player.

The gap would be a little less on an hourly basis. That’s because there are regular bonus activities for video slots and most three-reel games don’t. You don’t make any extra wagers during promotions, so you make fewer bets on video slots every hour.

Nonetheless, bonus payouts are included in the percentage of overall payback, so the point remains that paybacks on low value computers are higher.